Apple and Rye Pancakes with Crème Fraîche

Vermont Creamery provided ingredients for this recipe.

image.jpg
image.jpg

The humble pancake is as infinitely variable as it is easy to make. Mixing basic pancakes from scratch takes maybe a minute or two longer than ones from a packaged mix. This variation with apples, rye flour and crème fraîche asks only that you slice an apple and add one extra ingredient (and if rye flour is not on your shelf, that you shop the day before). 

Buttermilk might not be a pantry staple for you, but let me make the case. I don't really drink milk, I use it mostly for baking. Real buttermilk, because it's cultured, lasts longer, and it makes more tender and flavorful cakes, biscuits, and pancakes. It's not hard to use up a quart. It's tang compliments the rye flour in this recipe, as does crème fraîche.

If you're not familiar with crème fraîche, it's thick cultured cream. It tastes rich, subtly complex, and slightly sour. The best use, as far as I'm concerned, is to serve it with fresh berries: dessert in an instant! But berries aren't in season now. In this batter, crème fraîche makes the pancakes rich and tender, and served on top it's like whipped cream for grown-ups.

Apple Rye Pancakes

serves 2 hungry adults

  • 1 medium apple
  • 1 cup rye flour
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt (or 1/2 teaspoon table salt)
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 cup crème fraîche, plus more for serving
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk
  • butter and maple syrup for serving

1. Peel and core the apple, and cut it into very thin slices. Set aside. Heat a griddle to 375, or a skillet over medium-high heat. Heat the oven to 150-200 degrees, and set out an oven-safe plate or pan.

2. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients: rye flour, sugar, salt and baking soda. In a small mixing bowl, beat the egg. Whisk in the crème fraîche, then the buttermilk. Mix the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Stir only long enough to moisten the flour–lumps are ok and stirring too much will make rubbery pancakes!    

3. Swipe the griddle or pan with butter to grease it. Dollop about 1/4 cup of dough onto it, spreading it out sou it's about 1/2 inch thick. Press a few apple slices into the top of the dough. Cook until the bottom edge look firm, and you see a few bubbles in the top of the pancake. Flip, and cook a few minutes more. Place the finished pancake on the oven-safe plate or pan, and keep warm it in the oven. Repeat until you've used up all the dough.

4. Serve warm pancakes with butter, maple syrup and crème fraîche.

 

You might also like:

5 Things to Put on Pancakes when You're Out of Maple Syrup


Weekday Waffles

image.jpg

You might think of waffles as a weekend-only breakfast ordeal, but when you make the batter the night before, weekday waffles are easier than frying eggs!

I woke up on Wednesday morning to the buttery yeasty smell of overnight waffles. My boyfriend was in the kitchen perfecting his technique with our brand new Belgian waffle maker (we finally grew tired of the Hello Kitty one I bought when I was 20, with its tiny kitty-shaped waffles). The pull of sleep is strong––I'm not naturally morning person––but the pull of waffles is stronger, especially when their toasty aroma and the sound of a kettle clanking onto the stove draws you from your pillow to the kitchen table.

Here's the recipe, so you too can wake up to waffles. If there's not already someone in the kitchen making them for you, it's ok, because all you have to do is scoop batter into the waffle iron and sip your coffee while they cook. You'll have prepared the batter the night before (and dreamed sweetly of waffles all night). If you're solo, or the family doesn't have a big appetite, leftover waffles can be frozen to be toasted at a later date. Or you could eat them for lunch with savory toppings like sharp cheese and sweet cherry tomatoes.  

Get out the measuring cups to night, and you'll be able to make waffles with your eyes closed tomorrow. Not only does thinking ahead make the morning cooking easier, rising the batter overnight develops a rich bready flavor unlike any other waffle you've had.

image.jpg

Overnight Waffles

adapted from the Fannie Farmer

  • 2 1/4 teaspoons (1 package) dry yeast
  • 2 cups warm whole milk
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1. Make the batter the night before. Put 1/2 cup tepid water in a large mixing bowl (the batter will double in size), add the yeast and stir. Let stand for 5 minutes. 

2. Add the warm milk, melted butter, salt, sugar, and flour (everything except the eggs and baking soda). Beat with a whisk until the batter is smooth.

3. In the morning, plug in your waffle iron and heat it up. Beat the eggs. Stir the eggs and baking soda into the batter. Cook the waffles according to the waffle iron manufacturer's instructions. Generally, when the steam subsides, the waffle is ready. Waffles can be kept warm in a 250 degree Fahrenheit oven for about 15 minutes. Extra waffles can be frozen.

Coconut (water) Almond Milk

 

image.jpg

Only in Los Angeles can you have freshly made nut milk delivered to your door twice a week. I was visiting a friend near Venice Beach who poured my a glass of this elixir––almond milk made with coconut water––oh my god! If only I could get this stuff in Brooklyn! Maybe I should move to the West Coast, where there's local produce year round, and I can get coconut almond milk delivered (by bicycle) in a Mason jar.

Well, I can stay in New York for now, because I've figured out how to make it myself, and it's not that hard. Wherever you are, you can too. It's as simple as steeping ground almonds in coconut water, then straining the milky liquid. Sure, if you could crack a coconut yourself, that would be ideal, but thankfully cartons of coconut water are available just about everywhere now (Harvest Bay and Trader Joe's brands taste freshest to me). If you don't have a food processor for grinding nuts (or you just don't want to get it out) you can cheat: Bob's Red Mill sells bags of almond meal, and they work just fine.

I'm generally not a fan of kitchen tools that serve only one purpose, but after making a dozen batches of this, I bought a nut milk bag. It makes this process even easier. They cost only a few dollars, and you can find one at a health food store or online. Before that, I used a small cotton produce bag. Doubled up cheescloth knotted with a piece of kitchen twine will also work––improvise with what you have on hand.

Describing something as ambrosial is overdone and sounds cliché, but this really is! You won't even want to use it for cereal, it's so preciously delicious. 

 

Coconut (water) Almond Milk

makes 1 quart

  • 1/2 pound (about 2 cups) finely ground almonds
  • 1 quart (4 cups) coconut water

1. Bundle the ground almonds in a nut milk bag, small cotton bag, or doubled up cheescloth, and tie it tightly.

2. Put the bundle in a large nonreactive bowl, and pour the coconut water over it.

3. Leave this for 6-8 hours, or overnight, occasionally squeezing the bag to incorporate the coconut water and nut meal. It will realease a milky liquid.

4. Squeeze and knead the bag to mix the nuts and water one last time, then lift it out and squeeze it over the bowl to wring out all the milk. (Save the spent almonds to use in muffins, bread, or pancakes) .

5. Funnel the milk into a jar or bottle. Keep refrigerated, and shake before using. Don't worry if it separates! This keeps well for three to four days. It will ferment if you keep it much longer, so drink up!

 

You might also like:

Cooking By Ear

Green Tea Rice Macaroons

Lemon Shortcake

Photo: Lauren Colchamiro for Sweets & BItters

This is one of those desserts that will make your cooking seem fabulously effortless! Make the lemon curd ahead (pretty little jars of it also make a wonderful gift). While you’re at it, cut a lemon into thin slices and leave it to soak in rich simple syrup: 1/2 cup sugar dissolved, with the help of heat and stirring, in ¼ cup water. When your guests are on their way, a batch of fresh biscuits can be mixed and baked in 20 minutes. Whisk up a bowl of lightly sweetened whipped cream. Just before serving, split the biscuits, fill them with lemon curd and whipped cream, and put another little dollop of cream on top with a sweetened lemon-slice pressed into it (save the syrup for cocktails). Edible flowers add a lovely flourish if you can find some.

Hint: Buy potted pansies, violas, or johnny jump-up plants to use for your edible flower garnish. It can be hard to find just the flowers, and this way you will have a nice little

 

Lemon Shortcake

make about 12 shortcakes

 

for the lemon curd

  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • zest and juice of 2 lemons
  • 4 ounces (1 stick) unsalted butter, cold

 

for simple biscuits

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 Tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 5 Tablespoons cold butter
  • 3/4  cup buttermilk or plain yogurt

 

for assembling shortcakes

  • whipped cream
  • syrup-soaked lemon slices (see headnote)
  • edible flowers, such as violas (optional)

 

cooking the lemon curd

1. In a double boiler or a small heavy-bottomed saucepan, whisk together the eggs and yolks. Whisk in the sugar and salt, then the lemon zest and juice. Cut the butter into several small pieces, and add it. Set the saucepan or double boiler over medium heat.

2. Cook, stirring constantly, until the butter is incorporated and the mixture thickens. Never allow it to boil, or it will separate and curdle. When the curd is nearly thick enough that you can imagine spreading it on toast, but still a little too runny for that, remove it from the heat; it will continue to thicken as it cools.

3. Transfer the curd to a bowl or jar. Press a piece of plastic wrap onto the surface of the curd, and pierce a small hole in it. This will prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate until cool. This will keep, covered and refrigerated, for up to two weeks.

 

baking the biscuits

1. Preheat your oven to 450 degrees fahrenheit, and line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Combine all the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl; stir with a fork or whisk to combine. Cut the butter into small pieces and work it into the dry ingredients: pinch the butter and flour together until the mixture resembles fine bread crumbs or coarse cornmeal. 

2. Stir in the buttermilk or yogurt. When the mixture becomes too stiff to stir, mix and knead with your hands, just until it holds together in a ball. Roll the dough out onto a floured surface to about 1/2 inch thick, then fold it in half, and in half again. Roll out again to about 3/4 inch thick. Cut 2-inch circles out of the dough, using a cookie cutter or a sturdy glass. Place them on the baking sheet. (Scraps can be pressed together, rolled out again, and cut out).

3. Bake the biscuits for 7-9 minutes. Serve warm, if possible. These are best within a few hours of baking.

 

assembling the shortcakes

1. Break the biscuits in half. Fill each with a spoonful of lemon curd and a spoonful of whipped cream. Put the top back on the biscuit.

2. Dollop more whipped cream on top, and garnish it with one of the syrup-soaked lemon slices and an edible flower. Serve right away.

 

 

For Valentine's Day, Keep it Simple

Transient

This year, keep Valentine's day simple with these heart shaped pancakes. (And if you're not in love, you can still make them for your mom, your best friend, or yourself).

Valentine's is the worst day of the year to go out to dinner (you're likely to pay a premium for uninspired food in a very crowded restaurant, and if you don't get into an argument, you'll probably have to overhear someone else's). The bombardment of chocolates and roses leading up to the 14th can seem more annoying than romantic. Still, if you have a sweetheart, its unkind not to observe the holiday. And isn't it nice, after all, to have a holiday dedicated to love?

Who doesn't adore having breakfast made for them? Even if you are totally unprepared (or you blew it on Valentines day and you need to get out of the doghouse the next morning), you can probably make pancakes for your sweetheart. You most likely have all the ingredients in your pantry, and you can dash to the corner store, or knock on a neighbor's door to borrow a cup of milk. If you don't have measuring cups and spoons, no sweat! You can use a mug and a tea spoon. This recipe is incredibly forgiving––just don't over-stir it.

Sometimes the simplest gestures are the most thoughtful. And this easy breakfast is a celebration of love that you might find yourself repeating throughout the year.

Basic Pancakes

To make these vegan, omit the egg, use nondairy milk, and add a teaspoon of lemon or cider vinegar. If you have buttermilk, use that instead of milk and substitute 1/2 teaspoon baking soda for the baking powder. Try replacing 1/3 of the flour with whole wheat, rye, or any other interesting flour for heartier pancakes.

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • generous pinch salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup milk
  • oil or butter, for greasing the pan

1. Put a skillet on the stove over medium heat — it needs to be thoroughly heated by the time you drop batter in. Whisk together the dry ingredients: the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt. Beat the egg and combine it with the milk.

2. Pour the wet into the dry ingredients. Mix them quickly and leave some lumps (they will disappear as the pancakes cook). Don’t mix too much or the pancakes’ texture will be tough and chewy.

3. Pour a bit of oil into the pan to grease it lightly, turn up the heat to medium-high, and wait for the oil to warm so it shimmers. Or use butter and wait for it to melt. (If you want even-toned pancakes, use oil; butter gives a better flavor but makes the pancakes' surface splotchy and burns more easily).

4. Using a ladle, or a measuring cup with a spout, pour the batter onto the pan in a heart shape. If you're finding it difficult to draw a heart with the batter, try making the letter V (it will end up looking like a heart). You can use a spoon to quickly adjust the shape after the batter is poured.

5. When lots of tiny bubbles appear on the surface of the pancake, it’s ready to flip. Flip it, and cook until evenly browned. You can check the center for gooeyness with a toothpick or the tip of a sharp knife if you’re uncertain of whether it’s done. Repeat until the batter is used up.

Pancakes can be kept warm on a heatproof plate in a 200 degree oven for about 15 minutes before serving.

 

You might also like:

Perfect Whipped Cream