Hannah's Hot Pink Sauerkraut

image.jpg

How can just cabbage and salt taste so good?!? Even the simplest fermentation creates miraculous transformation, so it's no wonder people become obsessed with the process. If you're thinking of dabbling, sauerkraut is a great place to start. It's so easy you don't even need a proper recipe, just follow these basic steps:

  1. Cut up cabbage, saving a few of the outer leaves.
  2. Massage salt into it the chopped cabbage, about 1 teaspoon per pound.* This will release water from the chopped leaves.
  3. Press the chopped cabbage into a jar, food-grade bucket, or fermenting crock until enough water comes out to cover the cabbage. 
  4. Put the reserved leaves on top of the chopped cabbage.
  5. Weight this with something clean and nonreactive (I use a jar of water or small plate) to keep the cabbage submerged in it's own liquid.
  6. Put a cloth or loose lid over the top to keep dust and bugs out.
  7. Let this ferment at room temperature for 3-10 days, until it tastes sour enough for your taste. 

*If you don't have a kitchen scale, weigh the cabbages in the supermarket (or check your receipt). An average head is about 3-4 pounds.

To get a nice rosy hue, mix red and green cabbages. The batch pictured came from one red cabbage and three green ones (which yielded about four quarts). If you want to learn more about fermenting foods, I recommend reading Sandor Katz's The Art of Fermentation, the best and most thorough book on the subject. 

Simple Science: The salt you add, and lactic acid produced by the fermentation process create an environment hospitable to the "good" bacteria that are doing the fermenting and inhospitabale to "bad" bacteria. That's how you end up with something delicious and safe to eat!

 

You might also like:

Terri Lee's Soy Sauce Pickled Jalapeños

Quick Sriracha Pickles

Clover Club Cocktail

clover club cocktail

Who would think that a fluffy pink cocktail takes its name form an exclusive turn-of-the-last-century mens’ club? The look of the Clover Club cocktail is froofy, the taste is clear and refreshing, and the history is macho–evoking dark wood paneling, secret handshakes and bawdy laughs. Legend has it that Yeats or Twain could be found sipping one with dinner. And unlike many of the overpowing concoctions popular today, it’s gentle enough (in taste, at least) to enjoy with a meal. The bar in Brooklyn named after this drink/club is a great place to enjoy one, but you can easily make it at home.

Clover Club Cocktail

  • 3/4 ounce fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/3  to 1/2 ounce grenadine or raspberry syrup (depending on sweetness)
  • 1 1/2 ounces London dry gin
  • 1 ounce egg white (yield of one medium egg)

1. Pour the ingredients into a cocktail shaker in the order listed (to avoid currdling the egg). Dry shake (no ice) to whip the egg white into a thick white froth. The spring from a strainer or a few small shards of ice can speed the process. It usually takes at least 60 second of hard shaking.

2. Open the shaker and add very cold ice, filling the shaker it nearly to the brim. Shake with the ice until the shaker is nearly too cold to touch, and strain into a chilled coupe or martini glass.

Hannah's Hint: The bacteria we worry about with eggs are mostly on the shell. To sanitize them before using raw, dip them in a bowl of vinegar water, then rinse. I splash about 1 Tablespoons of white vinegar per 2 cups of luke-warm water. (This is based on folklore and common sense, so do your own reserach if you are really worried).